UC Stroke Team Readies for Splash at International Conference

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Pooja Khatri, MD, a neurologist with UC Health and the UC Comprehensive Stroke Center at UCNI. Photo by UC Academic Health Center Communications Services.

The University of Cincinnati Stroke Team is preparing to make news again. One of the most productive research organizations of its kind, the UC Stroke Team will be presenting more than 50 posters, lectures and symposia at the upcoming International Stroke Conference 2013, which begins Wednesday in Honolulu.

“We will be presenting the results of large, multi-center and multi-national randomized clinical trials that we have created and run,” says Dawn Kleindorfer, MD, Professor of Neurology at UC and Co-Director of the UC Stroke Team.

“We have platform and poster presentations regarding research in all facets of acute stroke care, including stroke epidemiology and prevention, randomized acute treatment clinical trials, genetics, and recovery after stroke. It is likely that fewer than five other centers in the United States, if any, will have the volume or diversity of research that will be presented by the University of Cincinnati.”

Joseph Broderick, MD

On February 7 Joseph Broderick, MD, the Albert Barnes Voorheis Professor & Chair of Neurology and Research Director of UCNI, will present overall results of the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III Trial, the largest randomized interventional stroke trial ever conducted. Dr. Broderick has served as Principal Investigator of the trial since 2005.

Pooja Khatri, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology and a UC Health neurologist, will give five presentations, including a report on a specific aspect of the IMS III Trial.

Opeolu Adeoye, MD

Opeolu Adeoye, MD, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine & Neurosurgery and Interim Director of the Division of Neurocritical Care at the UC Medical Center, will report on the CLEAR-ER stroke trial, a multicenter study that is exploring the safety and effectiveness of an enhanced combination treatment for patients who have suffered an acute ischemic stroke.

The UC Stroke Team is a component of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at the UC Neuroscience Institute (UCNI), one of four institutes of the UC College of Medicine and UC Health. The Comprehensive Stroke Center’s medical directors are Dr. Kleindorfer and Mario Zuccarello, MD, the Frank H. Mayfield Professor and Chairman of the UC Department of Neurosurgery. The UC Comprehensive Stroke Center has been designated a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission since 2005 and cares for more stroke patients than any other institution in the region. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of disability in adults.

The multidisciplinary UC Stroke Team includes physicians, nurses and technicians from six specialties: neurology, neurosurgery, emergency medicine, interventional neuroradiology, neurocritical care and physical medicine & rehabilitation.

In 2012, these collaborating specialists published more than 80 peer-reviewed journal articles while garnering more than $29 million in federal research funding. That funding figure does not include industry-sponsored research.

“The breadth and depth of this published research is a significant accomplishment,” Dr. Kleindorfer says. “We are making a difference in the world’s understanding of stroke and in its ability to prevent and treat stroke. Our team should take a moment to celebrate our work and its effect on healthcare worldwide.”

A small sampling of topics covered in the publications:

  • Geographic and racial differences in stroke
  • Heredity and stroke
  • Trends in substance abuse and stroke in young adults
  • Risk factors according to hemorrhage location
  • Spreading depolarizations in patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Carotid artery stenosis as a cause of stroke
  • Stent-assisted coiling of cerebral aneurysms
  • Crosstalk and binding of endothelin receptors

Since its establishment in 1994, the UC Stroke Team has implemented new interventional treatments for acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke; has illuminated the underlying genetic, behavioral and cultural risk factors for stroke; and has been awarded millions of dollars in research grants each year from the National Institutes of Health.

The UC Comprehensive Stroke Center provides comprehensive treatment for cerebrovascular conditions that include transient ischemic attack (TIA), ischemic stroke, brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and moyamoya disease.

— Cindy Starr

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